Trail Days Dresses

An odd thing appeared to me as I entered Trail Days in Damascus, Virginia. Of the many thousands of people attending the events, vendors, music venues, street theater, tent city area, food trucks, etc., I noticed that many of the men were dressed in dresses. Women’s dresses. When I say many, I mean about every 10th guy had on some type of skirt, kilt, or, more often than not, a long women’s dress. And if every 10th guy is in a dress, then I’m noticing a guy in a dress about every 10 seconds! Hairy legs were sticking out the bottom and hairy arms and back stuck out the top of these dresses, but, of course, one doesn’t say anything. And these were some flamboyant dresses; nobody wearing a dress was trying to ‘blend in’ and ‘pass’ as a woman.

OK. Wow. I thought about it and concluded that this was a pretty brave thing happening here and, oddly, I was proud of the ‘hiker community’ for expressing themselves as such. This must be a statement about the safety of expressing one’s gender-fluidity, about expressing oneself in the manner of dress that one likes regardless of societal pressure. Possibly even many of these people were not themselves inherently inclined to such dress but were, (even more brave, perhaps?), coming out as ‘allies’ in the effort to bring awareness to the strictures of societal norms while encouraging the abolition of stereotypes of dress and behavior that keep so many people from living their lives in concert with their true feelings. Furthermore, now that I thought of it, what better venue for this progressive demonstration of the comprehensiveness of humanity than in the ‘Trail Community’ of hikers where all walks of life converge annually in a pilgrimage to understanding, healing, and fellowship–a living slipstream of all ages, orientations, and backgrounds where tolerance, support and fellowship flourish as naturally as wildflowers bloom in Spring.

Overkill? A little heavy-handed? I’ve had those thoughts before, and one example comes to mind: When I started law school in 1996 I immediately noticed that all, all references to lawyers and judges in the casebooks used the feminine pronouns: she, her, etc. I thought it was bizarre; literally every such reference, on every page, jumped out at me as there were then relatively very few women in the legal profession at the time and I considered it heavy-handed that the authors had made the deliberate decision to go 100% female in the depictions of legal professionals. Maybe some sociologist Graduate student had this brilliant idea to train a new generation of lawyers into thinking less stereotypically and the publishing community bought off on it. Well, the times they were a’changing and the authors knew it and they had the last laugh. By the end of the very first semester, I no longer thought of it as odd that women could be lawyers or judges. I laughed at how effective the technique was–a blitzkrieg of new understanding–and I was better off for it. (Incidentally, over half of all lawyers are women today!)

So, back to men wearing dresses. I hitch-hiked a good portion of the way home and the person who picked me up was also leaving Trail Days and at one point mentioned how Trail Days does something silly every year for the fun of it. This year it was ‘men-wear-dresses’. Just like ‘silly hat day’ at work or whatnot.

Whoops! Maybe sometimes I overthink things. You think?

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